Tuesday, October 19 2021

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Q Have you detected a devious anxiety?

A

Well we have a roundabout now. It’s a single lane, so there was a bit of trepidation, trepidation, of having to negotiate a two-lane roundabout.

Q

Why?

A

People are just not familiar with roundabouts. Chances are a number of islanders have never driven one before. You might call it fear of the unknown.

Q

What is your personal comfort level with roundabouts, on a scale of 1 to 10?

A

I have lived in a few other Canadian cities where they exist so I would be an 8 to 10.

Q

There are no roundabouts in Toronto. If I visit your province, what are the roundabout rules of engagement?

A

Don’t have roundabouts in Toronto?

Q

We have traffic jams.

A

We don’t deal with this very often. It’s funny. The animation we have for our [animated rules of the roundabout tutorial] the site is from Waterloo. It’s not too far from Toronto.

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Q

So what are the rules?

A

Rule # 1 is to enter the correct lane and stay in that lane until you are done negotiating the roundabout. Rule n ° 2: give way to pedestrians, and give way to traffic already in the roundabout. Rule # 3: signal your intention. If you are approaching the roundabout and taking what would normally be on the right, signal to the right and stay in the right lane. If you go straight, or until the second stretch of the roundabout, you do not sign to indicate that you are going straight. If you go left or make a full U-turn around the roundabout you will signal left and you would be on the inside lane until you are about to exit – when you signal right to indicate that you are about to leave.

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Q

It sounds like common sense.

A

It’s only common sense if you have a basic comparison, but it doesn’t make sense because we haven’t had roundabouts often.

Q

Should pedestrians be afraid?

A

No. You approach by crossing a pedestrian crossing at a roundabout in the same way as you would any other signposted intersection. You want to make sure that the traffic is going to give way to you. Make eye contact with the drivers, so everyone knows what everyone is going to be doing, and it’s safe to do so.

Q

I understand the province is setting up a deadlock that people can practice on.

A

It is an initiative of the City of Charlottetown. Part of the problem with a dead roundabout is that, unless it is very crowded, you have no idea what a real roundabout is, because you are going around it without. no traffic.

Q

Is there an apprehension of utter chaos once the crowds of tourists reach the roundabouts?


A

I have been to other Canadian cities where there are other roundabouts, maybe not in Toronto, but in jurisdictions all over North America. I would suggest the skill level for roundabouts outside of PEI. would be higher than in PEI.

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